Eyes On The Animals

panda cam

Watching live video streams of animals undisturbed in their natural habitat has become a growing preoccupation for animal lovers around the world. With new technology such as drones and remote recording, keeping an eye on the wonders of nature has become a lot easier, regardless of what species of wildlife you’re interested in.

There are small but passionate teams of wildlife enthusiasts in virtually all corners of the world who use webcams to record and share footage of their local species. These facilities give us living glimpses of a world that would otherwise remain hidden and unknown to us. From underwater penguins to majestic tigers, here is a collection of some of the best animal live streams you can view from the comfort of your home:

If you love big cats, the Big Cat Rescue’s Tiger Lake cam, located in Tampa, Florida shows two tigers go about living their lives as they walk around their enclosure and cool off in their lake. The non-profit organization is also committed to providing permanent shelter for big cats who have suffered some form of abuse and abandonment. Big Cat Rescue is not only a home for tigers, it also provides shelter for more than seventy lions, tigers, bobcats, and cougars.

There is something about watching animals swim or drift underwater that could keep even the busiest of people watching for hours. The Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach, California has an amazing collection of webcams in many of their exhibits. The underwater penguin cam shows the expert swimmers as they dive and dart through the water. There is also a live stream capturing the Aquarium’s largest sharks in the big tank at Shark Lagoon.

If you are fond of puppies, Warrior Canine Connection’s Puppy Enrichment Center features future service dogs who will help wounded veterans renew bonds with their loved ones. A Gathering of Dogs grants you a pass into the world of five dogs who strive to get along in the same household. Getting to know the personalities of the different dogs is only half the fun of the whole camera set-up.

Situated near the Tayna Reserve in the Democratic Republic of Congo, The Gorilla Rehabilitation and Conservation Education Center which provides aid to orphaned Grauer’s gorillas, broadcasts live footage of these amazing animals from within its 39-acre forest habitat. You’re sure to find footage of snoozing humans as the staff sleep with the infant gorillas, the same way the gorilla’s mothers would do in the wild.

If you would rather watch birds, we’ve also got you covered. The American Eagle Foundation has eyes on a pair of bald eagles, named Mr. President and The First Lady who built their nest in a tulip poplar at the U.S National Arboretum in Washington, D.C in 2014. You can also follow the life of an Allen’s hummingbird as she tends to her nest, trying to keep the eggs warm until they hatch. This hummingbird, named Bella by an anonymous homeowner has been returning to the same ficus tree in Southern California to build nests for 11 years.

Pandas are a lot of fun to watch. Follow the adventures of Mei Xiang and her baby Bei Bei, two giant pandas via the two panda cams trained on them at the Smithsonian National Zoological Park. Just in case your time zone doesn’t fit with Mei and Bei’s schedule, you can also follow Gao Gao, Xiao Liwu and Bai Yun on San Diego Zoo’s panda cam.

Check out a few more of our favorite webcams, offering an unedited view of amazing animals:

International Wolf Center: This wolf cam, run by a team of biologists who are dedicated to teaching about grey wolves broadcasts continuous footage of these creatures as they live their lives around their enclosed habitat.

NYU’s Hawk Cam: Watch newly hatched baby hawks as they grow up and fly their nest outside the Bobst Library office of the NYU’s president.

Squam Lakes Fox Den: These little cute foxes on the ground of Squam Lakes Natural Science Center have an adorable family of 11. Watch them play and scurry around their den.

Pacific walruses: This cam broadcasts footage of Round Island, one of Alaska’s major terrestrial areas where, in the spring, male Pacific walruses haul themselves out of the water for a few days at a time. 14,000 walruses have been spotted on Round Island in a single day.